Barstow Alexander Institute
Marj teaching

As a world-renowned master teacher, Marjorie Barstow made many contributions to The Alexander Technique. In over 60 years of teaching, she guided students as they discovered the practical application of Alexander's discoveries in every day activities.

As trained by Miss Barstow, the faculty of The Barstow Institute continue her pioneering work in the summer workshops and in their own teaching practices. Practical applications with new or familiar activities deepen the experience for each student. Whether sitting in a chair or blowing bubbles, going for a walk or singing a song, the result of clear direction and effort in activity is a rewarding one. Daily schedule.

Faculty

Diana Bradley Diana Bradley, M.Ed., has been a certified teacher of the Alexander Technique since 1979. She completed a 13-year apprenticeship with Marjorie Barstow and had the opportunity to travel and teach with Marj in Australia and New Zealand. Diana was a modern dancer for 10 years and has 16 years of training in Aikido holding a third-degree black belt. She was on the faculty of the Baltimore School for the Arts for 11 years where she worked exclusively with theater students. She recently completed a 2-year program in Gestalt Therapy. Currently, Diana teaches groups and individuals in the greater Washington, D.C. area. e-mail.
Marilou Chacey Marilou Chacey found lifelong change flowed from F. M. Alexander's discoveries. She has shared these changes with students for over thirty years. Introduced to Marj Barstow's teaching in 1974 at Ohio State University, Marilou was inspired to move to Lincoln, Nebraska, and develop her skills as an Alexander teacher. Having an academic and professional background in dance/movement education and mental health, she is attuned to both kinesics and human understanding. Now teaching in Thousand Oaks, California, Marilou approaches change through the use of delicate self-discipline. e-mail
Stacy Gehman Stacy Gehman began studying the Technique in 1977, then moved to Lincoln in 1980 to apprentice with Ms. Barstow. In 1986, he co-founded The Performance School in Seattle, Washington, where he currently teaches the Technique and Tai Chi Chuan. A physicist, he also works as a research engineer in medical instrumentation. In his teaching he emphasizes the process of observation, thinking, and experimentation in movement. Visit Stacy's Web site. e-mail
Julie Rothschild

Julie Rothschild began studying Alexander Technique at The Ohio State University as a graduate student in 1993. A dancer and athlete with numerous injuries and surgeries, she found in AT a new and welcome approach to movement. A Barstow-lineage teacher, Julie completed her Alexander Technique training in 2007 at Chesapeake Bay Alexander Studies with second generation teachers Robin Gilmore and Marsha Paludan. She received additional certification fromAlexander Technique International. Julie maintains her private practice in Boulder, CO, and has taught workshops and ongoing classes throughout the United States as well as in Mexico, Spain, Switzerland, Canada and Ireland. Julie is an active choreographer and performer, as well as a certified Cross Country Ski Instructor, PSIA.
website: www.julierothschildmovement.com and email: julie@julierothschildmovement.com

Nancy Forst Williamson Nancy Forst Williamson, M.A., has been studying and working in the field of mind-body education for over 40 years and is the Program Director for The Barstow Institute. A native Nebraskan, she began an on-going apprenticeship with Marjorie Barstow in 1975. She also trained with Moshe Feldenkrais and is a certified practitioner of Awareness Through Movement and Functional Integration. Nancy holds degrees from UNL and Doane College-Lincoln with a focus on communication, aging, and human learning and response. She regards the Alexander Technique as an extraordinary avenue for development of individual expression and style. e-mail
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